6 days ago

Lenhart, Mason & Associates, LLC

Celebrating the end of another successful tax season! ... See MoreSee Less

Today is the day, friends! New forms and many, many tax law changes added some excitement and some hours to our tax season, but we made it! #TaxSeason2019 #weneedanap ... See MoreSee Less

Today is the day, friends!  New forms and many, many tax law changes added some excitement and some hours to our tax season, but we made it!  #TaxSeason2019 #weneedanap

Our office will be closed Tuesday, April 16th to give our employees a little time to recover from a busy tax season and become reacquainted with their families. We will reopen at 8am Wednesday, April 17th. ... See MoreSee Less

Our office will be closed Tuesday, April 16th to give our employees a little time to recover from a busy tax season and become reacquainted with their families.  We will reopen at 8am Wednesday, April 17th.

Today we enjoyed some sweet treats from our friends at First Interstate Bank! Thanks so much for thinking of us! ... See MoreSee Less

Today we enjoyed some sweet treats from our friends at First Interstate Bank!  Thanks so much for thinking of us!

Almost there! #TaxSeason2019 ... See MoreSee Less

Almost there!  #TaxSeason2019

Many thanks to our friends at Jonah Bank for the wonderful lunch today! Your kind gesture is very much appreciated! ... See MoreSee Less

Many thanks to our friends at Jonah Bank for the wonderful lunch today!  Your kind gesture is very much appreciated!

If you’re getting a divorce, you know it’s a highly stressful time. But if you’re a business owner, tax issues can complicate matters more. For example, you can generally divide most assets, including business ownership interests, between you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse without any federal income or gift tax consequences. When an asset falls under the tax-free transfer rule, the spouse who receives the asset takes over its existing tax basis and existing holding period. bit.ly/2Vw0q2L ... See MoreSee Less

If you’re getting a divorce, you know it’s a highly stressful time. But if you’re a business owner, tax issues can complicate matters more. For example, you can generally divide most assets, including business ownership interests, between you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse without any federal income or gift tax consequences. When an asset falls under the tax-free transfer rule, the spouse who receives the asset takes over its existing tax basis and existing holding period. http://bit.ly/2Vw0q2L

If you’re getting a divorce, you know it’s a highly stressful time. But if you’re a business owner, tax issues can complicate matters more. For example, you can generally divide most assets, including business ownership interests, between you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse without any federal income or gift tax consequences. When an asset falls under the tax-free transfer rule, the spouse who receives the asset takes over its existing tax basis and existing holding period. bit.ly/2Vw0q2L ... See MoreSee Less

If you’re getting a divorce, you know it’s a highly stressful time. But if you’re a business owner, tax issues can complicate matters more. For example, you can generally divide most assets, including business ownership interests, between you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse without any federal income or gift tax consequences. When an asset falls under the tax-free transfer rule, the spouse who receives the asset takes over its existing tax basis and existing holding period. http://bit.ly/2Vw0q2L

Here are a few key tax deadlines for businesses during Q2 of 2019. APR. 1: File with the IRS if you’re an employer that will electronically file 2018 Forms 1097, 1098, certain Forms 1099 and/or Form W-2G. APR. 15: If you’re a calendar-year corporation, file a 2018 income tax return (Form 1120) or file for a six-month extension (Form 7004) and pay any tax due. APR. 30: Employers report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for Q1 2019 (Form 941) and pay any tax due. bit.ly/2YoLo0p ... See MoreSee Less

Here are a few key tax deadlines for businesses during Q2 of 2019. APR. 1: File with the IRS if you’re an employer that will electronically file 2018 Forms 1097, 1098, certain Forms 1099 and/or Form W-2G. APR. 15: If you’re a calendar-year corporation, file a 2018 income tax return (Form 1120) or file for a six-month extension (Form 7004) and pay any tax due. APR. 30: Employers report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for Q1 2019 (Form 941) and pay any tax due. http://bit.ly/2YoLo0p
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