Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

These days, most businesses have some intangible assets such as patents, trademarks, customer lists and leases. The tax treatment of these assets is complex. IRS regulations generally require the capitalization of costs to acquire or create an intangible asset, as well as take other actions involving intangibles. Capitalized costs can’t be deducted in the year paid or incurred. If they’re deductible, they must be ratably deducted over the life of the asset (or, for some assets, over periods specified by the tax code or under regulations). However, capitalization generally isn’t required for costs not exceeding $5,000 and for certain other amounts. bit.ly/3id9Gc9 ... See MoreSee Less

These days, most businesses have some intangible assets such as patents, trademarks, customer lists and leases. The tax treatment of these assets is complex. IRS regulations generally require the capitalization of costs to acquire or create an intangible asset, as well as take other actions involving intangibles. Capitalized costs can’t be deducted in the year paid or incurred. If they’re deductible, they must be ratably deducted over the life of the asset (or, for some assets, over periods specified by the tax code or under regulations). However, capitalization generally isn’t required for costs not exceeding $5,000 and for certain other amounts. https://bit.ly/3id9Gc9

It’s a great day to get out there and support the many wonderful small businesses in our community! #smallbusinesssaturday ... See MoreSee Less

It’s a great day to get out there and support the many wonderful small businesses in our community!  #smallbusinesssaturday

Wishing you all a happy and blessed Thanksgiving! ... See MoreSee Less

Wishing you all a happy and blessed Thanksgiving!

If your business is closing down, we’re here to assist you in any way we can, including taking care of various tax obligations. A business must file a final income tax return and some other related forms for the year it closes. If you have employees, you must pay them final wages and compensation owed, make final federal tax deposits and report employment taxes. Failure to withhold or deposit employee income, Social Security and Medicare taxes can result in personal liability for what’s known as the Trust Fund Recovery Penalty. You must cancel your Employer Identification Number and close your IRS business account. There may be other responsibilities. Contact us with any questions. bit.ly/3grfrma ... See MoreSee Less

If your business is closing down, we’re here to assist you in any way we can, including taking care of various tax obligations. A business must file a final income tax return and some other related forms for the year it closes. If you have employees, you must pay them final wages and compensation owed, make final federal tax deposits and report employment taxes. Failure to withhold or deposit employee income, Social Security and Medicare taxes can result in personal liability for what’s known as the Trust Fund Recovery Penalty. You must cancel your Employer Identification Number and close your IRS business account. There may be other responsibilities. Contact us with any questions. https://bit.ly/3grfrma

Our heartfelt gratitude to all who have served! 🇺🇸 ... See MoreSee Less

Our heartfelt gratitude to all who have served! 🇺🇸

No one needs to remind business owners that the cost of employee health care benefits keeps going up. One way to provide some of these benefits is through an employer-sponsored Health Savings Account (HSA). For eligible individuals, HSAs offer a tax-advantaged way to set aside funds (or have their employers do so) to meet future medical needs. To be eligible, an individual must be covered by a “high deductible health plan.” For 2023, a “high deductible health plan” will be one with an annual deductible of at least $1,500 for self-only coverage, or at least $3,000 for family coverage. An HSA provides a number of tax benefits for your business and its employees. bit.ly/3zTfptS ... See MoreSee Less

No one needs to remind business owners that the cost of employee health care benefits keeps going up. One way to provide some of these benefits is through an employer-sponsored Health Savings Account (HSA). For eligible individuals, HSAs offer a tax-advantaged way to set aside funds (or have their employers do so) to meet future medical needs. To be eligible, an individual must be covered by a “high deductible health plan.” For 2023, a “high deductible health plan” will be one with an annual deductible of at least $1,500 for self-only coverage, or at least $3,000 for family coverage. An HSA provides a number of tax benefits for your business and its employees. https://bit.ly/3zTfptS

How much can you and your employees contribute to your 401(k)s next year? The IRS recently announced the 2023 cost-of-living adjustments. The amounts increased more than in recent years due to inflation. The 2023 contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k) plans will increase to $22,500 (from $20,500 in 2022). This amount also applies to 403(b) plans, most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan. The catch-up contribution limit for employees age 50 and over who participate in 401(k)s and the other plans mentioned above will increase to $7,500 (from $6,500 in 2022). That means those age 50 and older can contribute up to $30,000 to their 401(k)s in 2023. bit.ly/3UaVZZH ... See MoreSee Less

How much can you and your employees contribute to your 401(k)s next year? The IRS recently announced the 2023 cost-of-living adjustments. The amounts increased more than in recent years due to inflation. The 2023 contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k) plans will increase to $22,500 (from $20,500 in 2022). This amount also applies to 403(b) plans, most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan. The catch-up contribution limit for employees age 50 and over who participate in 401(k)s and the other plans mentioned above will increase to $7,500 (from $6,500 in 2022). That means those age 50 and older can contribute up to $30,000 to their 401(k)s in 2023. https://bit.ly/3UaVZZH
Load more